India's first chess features print magazine published quarterly from Lucknow since 2004 by Aspire Welfare Society.

Saturday, November 27, 2021

You have to enjoy what you do to excel: Carlsen

Magnus Carlsen (right) of Norway and Ian Nepomniachtchi of Russia at the press conference in Dubai on Wednesday. (International Chess Federation Twitter)


DUBAI, 24 November 2021 – Reigning world chess champion Magnus Carlsen and his Russian rival Ian Nepomniachtchi revealed some of their motivations during a press conference at Expo 2020 Dubai today, before they go head to head for the crown at the FIDE World Chess Championship (24-16 December).

The Norwegian has held the title since 2013 and is considered one of the greatest chess talents of all time. Carlsen became a grandmaster at the age of 13, and has been the world's number one player continuously since 2011.

Two-time Russian champion Nepomniachtchi is the winner of the 2020/21 Candidates Tournament and finished second in the 2019 FIDE Grand Prix, which qualified him for the Candidates Tournament.

Who is going to win this championship?

Ian Nepomniachtchi: “Normally, I think the best player wins.”

Magnus Carlsen: “I predict that the person who scores the most points over the next three weeks is going to be the winner and hopefully that’s going to be me and if I do win, it will probably be because I made some good moves and good decisions.”

Magnus, as you have held the World Champion title since 2013, does the pressure get easier?

Magnus Carlsen: “I think some parts of it may get easier as you get more experienced but it come comes down to how you perform over the board. It’s so intense and you also have lots of people in the team who have World Championship experience. But you’re probably a little bit less nervous than you are the first time.”

Women are a minority in the world of chess. Why do you think that is?

Ian Nepomniachtchi: “I think the general issues are that girls are less amazed [than boys] in chess skills classes, and they also have other hobbies. But I think there will be a time when we see some really strong female players.”

Magnus Carlsen: “I think this question is way too complicated to answer in a few sentences. There are a number of factors, especially cultural that have led to the situation we have today. I encourage everybody to play chess. And what I’ve found around the world is that young girls find as much joy as boys in the game of chess. And if that could be communicated more, I think that would be very helpful.”

As you know, Expo 2020 Dubai is focusing on inspiring our youth – the leaders of tomorrow. What’s your advice for young generation, who want to become champions like you?

Ian Nepomniachtchi: “You have got to enjoy what you’re doing, whether it’s chess or science or sports.”

Magnus Carlsen: “That what I would say – you have to enjoy what you do to excel in your field.”

Moderated by Maurice Ashley, the FIDE World Chess Championship Press Conference also featured Andrey Gureyev, CEO, Phosagro; Arkady Dvorkovich, FIDE President; and Dara Maher, Regional Head of Marketing, Kaspersky.

Magnus Carlsen also visited the Spain Pavilion at Expo 2020 Dubai, host of the World School Chess Tournament from the 25-29 November. Carlsen joined the world’s best female player in history, Judith Polgar, to take a group picture with the young participants. In total, 108 teenagers and children from 10 different countries have been grouped in 12 teams to play the finals at the event. -- Expo2020

Tuesday, November 2, 2021

Seven Indians in Top 100 of World Chess

New Delhi, Nov. 1: For the first time in the history of Indian chess, as many as seven players have made it into the Top 100 of world chess.
 K Sasikiran made this feat possible by beating Vladimir Fedoseev (Russia) in the fifth round of the FIDE Grand Swiss Chess 2021 on Sunday. It lifted his rating to 2649 and helped him re-enter the elite list.

V Anand (2751), Vidit Gujrathi (2727), P. Harikrishna (2718), Nihal Sarin (2659), SL Narayanan (2658) and B Adhiban (2653) are the other six players in the Top 100.

“This is a very proud moment for India,” AICF president Dr. Sanjay Kapoor said. “We have steadily been cementing our position as one of the top nations in the world of chess,” he added.

“A big thank you to 2700chess and @fide_chess for maintaining the statistics,” AICF secretary Bharat Singh Chauhan said.

Russia has 23 players in the Top 100, USA 10, China 9, Ukraine and India have 7 each. 

The average rating of Top 10 players of Russia is 2731, USA 2712, China 2699 and India 2671.

Ten Indian players are currently in action in the Open category of the FIDE Grand Swiss 2021 while five women are in fray in their class. -- AICF

Sunday, October 31, 2021

Harikrishna scores second straight win in FIDE Grand Swiss chess

Riga (Latvia), October 31: India’s P Harikrishna defeated Armenia’s Sergey Movsesian for his second straight victory in the FIDE Grand Swiss chess tournament late on Saturday evening here. (Photo: video grab)

Playing white, Harikrishna needed 56 moves in a Ruy Lopez game to take his tally to 2.5 points after four rounds. It put him in the company of dozens of players, including D Gukesh and K Sasikiran returned with half a point each.

France’s Alireza Firouzja (3.5) is the sole leader at this stage. Young Nihal Sarin is just half a point behind along with 10 other players after settling for a draw. S P Sethuraman (1.5) also split the point with veteran Boris Gelfand.

Young R Praggnanandhaa (2) lost his first game in the tournament, going down to Samuel Sevian. E Arjun (1.5), Surya Sekhar Ganguly (1.0) and B Adhiban (0.5) too suffered defeats.

In the women’s category, R Vaishali was the only Indian to register a victory on Day 4. She beat Meruert Kamalidenova (Kazakhstan) to move to two points.

D Harika held China’s Jiner Zhu to have three points in her kitty along with eight others behind the leader.

Tingjie Lei (3.5) wrested that honour after her win over Russia’s Valentina Gunina.

Padmini Rout lost to Russia’s Alina Kahslinskaya while Vantika Agrwal and Divya Deshmukh drew their games.

The Grand Swiss Tournament and Women’s Grand Swiss 2021 are part of the qualifications for the 2021-23 World Championship cycle. The top two finishers will qualify for the Candidates Tournament 2022.

Ten Indian men and five women are in the fray. -- AICF

Thursday, October 21, 2021

2021 Russian Chess Champions Crowned: Vitiugov and Gunina

The Russian Championships Superfinals finished in Ufa on the 20th of October. In the last 11th round of the open tournament, Vladimir Fedoseev lost to Pavel Ponkratov in a dramatic fight. The games Chigaev – Alekseenko, Goryachkina - Andreikin, Predke - Motylev, Rakhmanov - Vitiugov, and Esipenko - Matlakov were drawn.

Grandmaster Nikita Vitiugov scored 7 points out of 11 to become the Russian champion for the first time in his career.

- When the game was about to finish, I was confident that this was going to be a tie-break. It was a difficult moment: on the one hand, the tournament is over, and on the other hand, the fight for the first place is not yet out of the question. I already have experience finding myself in a similar situation and going down to Peter Svidler in a tie-break. I went for a walk because I simply wanted to be as fresh for the game as possible. I relaxed only when the situation clarified after the last move in the Esipenko – Matlakov game, said the tournament winner. - As for my participation, this is my 15th Russian championship, that is, I have played in as many superfinals as all other participants put together, and maybe even more. I was lucky in some games, but the opposite happened to me as well. The evaluation bar's sudden spikes towards one or the other player happened in nearly every game. I would not give up and keep on fighting, but it was not without lucky strikes for me either. You will never win such a tournament without them.

Maxim Matlakov won silver with 6.5 points. Vladimir Fedoseev is in third place: he got 6 points and edged out Dmitry Andreikin. All three prize-winners are from Saint Petersburg.

Final standings:

1. Nikita Vitiugov - 7 points
2. Maxim Matlakov - 6.5
3-4. Vladimir Fedoseev, Dmitry Andreikin - 6
5-9. Alexandr Predke, Andrey Esipenko, Alexander Motylev, Pavel Ponkratov, Kirill Alekseenko - 5.5
10-11. Aleksandra Goryachkina, Aleksandr Rakhmanov - 4.5
12. Maksim Chigaev - 4.

In the women’s tournament, the key game of the round between Valentina Gunina and Polina Shuvalova ended in a draw. Having scored 8 points out of 11 without any single loss, Valentina Gunina (Moscow) became the four-time Russian women's champion.

“Of course, I am very happy, but the final game was quite nervous. I'd been preparing for one thing, but Polina chose the line, which she had never played before. Of course, it is hard to play against an unexpected variation. I thought that I acted right, but it's rather difficult to access it without due analysis. In general, I've been very tired for the previous three days, so in such a case, one's brain can generate interesting reactions, that's why I'm glad that it all happened this way,” said Gunina after the game.

Evgenija Ovod (Saint Petersburg) drew against Alina Bivol and took second place with 7.5 points, having edged out Polina Shuvalova (Moscow), who won bronze.

The games Galliamova - Guseva, Pogonina - Garifullina, Voit - Kashlinskaya, and Bodnaruk - Girya were drawn.

Final standings:

1. Valentina Gunina - 8 points
2-3. Evgenija Ovod, Polina Shuvalova - 7.5
4. Alina Kashlinskaya - 6.5
5-6. Natalija Pogonina, Leya Garifullina - 6
7. Alisa Galliamova - 5.5
8. Olga Girya - 4.5
9. Marina Guseva - 4
10-12. Daria Voit, Anastasia Bodnaruk, Alina Bivol - 3.5.



The Superfinals are a part of the Chess in Museums international programme realised by the Chess Federation of Russia and the Elena and Gennady Timchenko Foundation.

The total guaranteed prize fund is 11 million rubles: 7 million rubles in the open section and 4 million rubles in the women's tournament.

The Superfinals were organised by the Chess Federation of Russia with support of the Russian Ministry of Sport, Government of the Republic of Bashkortostan, and the Elena and Gennady Timchenko Foundation. The CFR general partner is PhosAgro. Partners: Aeroflot, Art Russe, Chess Federation of the Republic of Bashkortostan, and the Bashkortostan State M.V. Nesterov Art Museum.

Friday, September 24, 2021

Indian Chess League: Nine Companies Show Interest

Jaipur, Sept 23: The Central Council and Special General Body meeting of All India Chess Federation held at Jaipur on Thursday took some major decisions for the development of the game in the country.

Nine companies showed interest for the much anticipated Indian Chess League and AICF formed a five member screening committee for the same.

In another major development, All India Chess Federation provisionally affiliated with the Indian Olympic Association while a National Chess Academy will be established at Odisha to provide exposure and training facilities for the players from across the country.

It is also decided to create a welfare fund for the benefit of players and arbiters. Currently AICF is providing assistance for Covid-19 through the Checkmate Covid program and the surplus fund in this project will be merged to this welfare fund.

Further, AICF decided to train two arbiters, two organizers and four players in each district of the country and Rs. 50 lakh has been allocated for this grass root level project.

The term ‘Open’ has been removed from the national championship and now the events will be called the National Championship.

The house extended its gratitude to the FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich for providing wild cards to Indian players in the World Cup and FIDE Grand Prix.

Wednesday, September 15, 2021

FIDE Online Olympiad Final Russia - USA 10 pm IST Today


The final match of the FIDE Online Olympiad between Russia and the USA will be held today, on the 15th of September. The match will begin at 7:30 PM Moscow time (16:30 UTC).

The second FIDE Online Olympiad 2020 is held on Chess.com, one of the biggest playing platforms. One hundred fifty-three countries have been taking part in the event from the start. Each team consists of six players and six reserves, in a mixed format with a minimum of three female players and two junior players. The qualifying events were played till the 10th of September. Team Russia entered the field in the Top Division on the 8th of September.

Representing the Russian team are:

Men: GM Alexander Grischuk, GM Daniil Dubov, GM Vladislav Artemiev, GM Vladimir Fedoseev

Women: GM Aleksandra Goryachkina, GM Alexandra Kosteniuk, GM Kateryna Lagno, GM Valentina Gunina

Juniors: GM Andrey Esipenko and IM Volodar Murzin

Girls: IM Polina Shuvalova and WGM Leya Garifullina.

The team captain is GM Alexander Motylev.

Team Russia took first place in Pool C, having won all the matches. On the way towards the final, the Russian team defeated Ukraine (4.5-1.5), Germany (6-0), Czech Republic (5-1), Paraguay (4.5-1.5), Israel (5-1), Argentina (6-0), Italy (5-1), Spain (4-2), and Latvia (6-0).

Two best teams of each pool advanced to the knock-out stage (Play-off). In the quarterfinals Team Russia defeated Hungary, having won both matches 3.5-2.5. In the semi-final, the Russians won against the Chinese team, one of the rating favourites. Our players won the first match 3.5-2.5 and the second 4-2 to advance to the final.

The second finalist was determined in the India vs USA match. The Americans won on tie-break (1-5, 4-2, 4.5-1.5) to qualify for the final.

Tuesday, September 14, 2021

Anish Giri Wins Tolstoy Cup in Yasnaya Polyana


The 12th of September marked the end of the first-ever international tournament held in honor of the great Russian writer Leo Tolstoy.

The tournament rating favorite, Anish Giri of Netherlands, has become its winner with a remarkable result of 8 out of 9 points.

Anish Giri, “I enjoyed my performance in Yasnaya Polyana. The result proved somewhat too high because on the second day I definitely did not play at the corresponding level. However, luck sided with me to the extent that nothing could stop. It goes without saying that I am a big fan of Leo Tolstoy’s creative works and I am very happy that this tournament has been organised. I have not been aware that Tolstoy was a chess fan, but my taking part in the sightseeing tour filled this gap. I hope this event will become traditional”.

Final standings:

1. Anish Giri (Netherlands) – 8 out of 9 points
2. Nodirbek Abdusattorov (Uzbekistan) – 5.5
3. Boris Gelfand (Israel) – 5
4-5. David Paravyan, Dmitry Andreikin (both from Russia) – 4.5
6-8. Anton Korobov (Ukraine), Maxim Matlakov, Evgeny Tomashevsky (all from Russia) – 4
9. Kirill Alekseenko (Russia) – 3.5
10. Nikita Vitiugov (Russia) – 2.

The winner received a cup manufactured at the Imperial Porcelain Factory specifically for this event.

An extensive additional program accompanied the Leo Tolstoy Cup: a 100-board simul with the GMs participating in the tournament, a mass blitz tournament for children, a lecture and a quiz by the curator of the CFR Chess Museum and candidate of historical sciences Dmitry Oleikniov. The Cultural Centre Yasnaya Polyana that hosted the tournament displayed the themed posters and unique chess sets Staunton and Regence.

The games were commented in Russian by GM Sergey Shipov (you could hear him comment in the tent set up in front of the Palace of Culture), and in English by GM Evgenij Miroshnichenko.

The tournament was hosted by the Leo Tolstoy Museum-Estate Yasnaya Polyana and the Chess Federation of Russia with the support of the Elena and Gennady  Timchenko Foundation.

Saturday, September 4, 2021

World-renowned GMs to Play in Leo Tolstoy’s Museum-Estate from Sept 11



Moscow: The first international tournament Tolstoy Cup featuring a stellar line-up will start in the State Leo Tolstoy Museum-Estate “Yasnaya Polyana”, the Tula region, on the great Russian writer’s birthday, the 9th of September. The event will last for four days and will finish on the 12th of September. Photo credit: Press service of the State Leo Tolstoy Museum-Estate “Yasnaya Polyana

The world and Russian chess stars will take part in the round-robin rapid tournament: Anish Giri (Netherlands), Dmitry Andreikin, Nikita Vitiugov, Evgeny Tomashevsky, Kirill Alekseenko, Maxim Matlakov, David Paravyan (all from Russia), Anton Korobov (Ukraine), Boris Gelfand (Israel), and Nodirbek Abdusattorov (Uzbekistan).

The event is organised by the State Leo Tolstoy Museum-Estate “Yasnaya Polyana” and the Chess Federation of Russia and is supported by the Elena and Gennady Timchenko Foundation.

Andrey Filatov, President of the Chess Federation of Russia:
- This tournament is held for the first time, and I hope it will set up a good tradition. Since 2012, the Chess Federation of Russian and the Elena and Gennady Timchenko Foundation have organised the tournaments as part of the Chess in Museums international programme. We are glad to introduce the chess world to Yasnaya Polyana, one of Russia’s most famous and beloved museums

Leo Tolstoy is a brilliant and timeless writer whose books are being read, studied, filmed, and staged. And now the first international event dedicated to him will be held. It is not an accident: Tolstoy loved chess, played a lot, and wrote about it. Obviously, chess was an integral part of his life.

We will be glad to see the guests and journalists at our festival dedicated to Leo Tolstoy’s birthday and the 100th anniversary of the founding of the State Leo Tolstoy Museum-Estate “Yasnaya Polyana”.

Ekaterina Tolstaya, Director of the State Leo Tolstoy Museum-Estate “Yasnaya Polyana”:
- We are glad that the International chess tournament will start in Yasnaya Polayan on Leo Tolstoy’s birthday. Chess has always been in Yasnaya Polayna, and Leo Tolstoy’s devotion to the game is well-known: he played chess with his relatives and friend and often offered to play a game to his guests.

One of the most welcomed guests was Prince Sergey Urusov, one of the best chess players of those times. Today, we are proud that the world-class grandmasters will participate in the tournament in Yasnaya Polyana.

It is also very important that children will take part in the festival. Playing chess is very effective for children’s formation: it changes a thinking process, and develops memory and imagination. We are grateful to the Elena and Gennady Timchenko Foundation for their support in holding this tournament and welcoming young talented players.

Maria Morozova, Managing Director of the Elena and Gennady Timchenko Foundation:
- The Tula region and the Timchenko Foundation have been united by long-term ties of friendship and cooperation in various sports projects: we are developing sledge hockey together, the local educational institutions are running the Chess in Schools projects, whilst the region is taking part in complex research of a cognitive as well as an emotional and personal spheres of the lives of younger schoolchildren of the city and village schools. That’s why our supporting of a chess tournament held in the Tula region is a logical continuation of our sports cooperation and a tribute to the great Russian writer, for whom both Yasnaya Polyana and chess were very important.

We hope that our young chess players, participants of the Chess in Schools project, will be highly motivated by playing in the same venue with the renowned grandmasters and be inspired to increase their level and develop their chess skills.

The opening ceremony will take place on the 9th of September. Leo Tolstoy's descendants, FIDE President Akrady Dvorkovich, and other guests of honour are expected to be present at the event.

A 100-board simultaneous exhibition will be held on the same day. The best participants will get presents from the organisers. Moreover, the Chess Museum’s curator, Cand. Sc. History Dmitry Oleinikov will give a lecture and a quiz.

The additional programme will continue on the 10th of September with a mass tournament for children. At the same time, the participants of the main event will be offered a tour around the estate museum; after it, the drawing of lots will take place. Children will have a chance to take a photo with renowned grandmasters and ask them for an autograph.

The international tournament will be held on the 11th and 12th of September. The participants will compete in 9 rapid rounds in an all-play-all event. The closing ceremony is scheduled for the 12th of September at 7 PM Moscow time.

Considering Leo Tolstoy’s devotion to chess, an exhibition featuring various thematic posters will be organised during the event.

Sunday, August 1, 2021

Anand to Lead Strongest Team India in Chess Olympiad

New Delhi: Five times world Champion Viswanathan Anand will lead the team of India in the second online chess Olympiad scheduled to be held from 8-15 September.

The Indian team that jointly won the gold medal alongside main competitors Russia, will be looking at repeating the feat and this time, hopefully, as a single winner of the gold medal.

For the first time ever, the Indian team has got an official sponsorship. One of pioneers of Wi-Fi Internet providers in the country, MICROSENSE, will be the key sponsor.

This time the team comprises Anand, Vidit Santosh Gujrathi, P Harikrishna, B Adhiban, Nihal Sarin, R Pragganandhaa, Koneru Humpy, D Harika, Tania Sachdev, Bhakti Kulkarni, R Vaishali and B Savitha Shri. Former national champion and British Chess Championship winner Grandmaster Abhijit Kunte has been appointed as non-playing vice captain of the team.

The Indian Chess Federation has ensured the best for the team. All the players will be provided a single room in a five star hotel in Chennai from where all the matches will be played. Contrary to the last Olympiad, a three tier internet connection along with support from two Grand Masters – D Gukesh and N Srinath has been done to make the team achieve another gold medal.

The first leg is scheduled to have ten teams from which two teams qualify and thereafter a knockout format has been decided by FIDE, the apex chess body.
All the games will be available live for the chess buffs.

“To bring the team together in one place is a dream come true in present times. We do not give any pressure, our aim is to have a healthy atmosphere where the team get along well", said AICF President Sanjay Kapoor about providing the extra facility.

“This is only the beginning of many more good things to come for Indian chess. We are working in several departments to bring the benefits of the game and our aim is simple – to make India the number one chess playing nation in the world", said Bharat Singh Chauhan, the honorary secretary of the federation.

Monday, June 7, 2021

India Age-Group Online Chess from June 10


The National Age Group Online Chess Championships 2021 will be held from 10 June 21 to 03 July 21. The championships will serves as selection event for the FIDE Online Youth & Cadet World Cup 2021. 

The championships will serves as selection event for the FIDE Online Youth & Cadet World Cup 2021.


The championships will serves as selection event for the FIDE Online Youth & Cadet World Cup 2021.


The categories are: 

Under-18 Open & Girls

Under-16 Open & Girls

Under-14 Open

Under-14 Girls

Under-12 Open

Under-12 Girls

Under-10 Open

Under-10 Girls


You can find all the brochures at the All-India Chess Federation official website.



Sunday, March 21, 2021

Chess at Age 2? Yes, says Dutch Trainer, Psychologist Karel van Delft

The agony of a chess parent has little relief. The most stressed out people at any kids' tournament are usually the parents!
Common questions go:
- Why is my child losing?
- What is required to become a champion?
- When to introduce my kid to chess?
- How to play, where to play, how to study etc.
Does not a guardian angel exist for chess parents and trainers?
Okay, we found one! In human suit, he goes by the name Karel van Delft.
Location: About an hour's train trip from Amsterdam, in the quaint town of Apeldoorn. 

However, you needn't risk travelling in these pandemic times. New in Chess has just published 2,000 hours of painstaking research, analysis and counselling ideas by this journalist, writer, chess trainer and psychologist.

Our writer, Shilpa Mehra, discusses the book, children's chess and Karel van Delft's online mental training sessions open to players and parents.
 
Chess school Schaakacademie Apeldoorn girls play against boys. As necessary Karel is counted a girl! (c) Karel van Delft


Keeping the Dutch orange ablaze on the cover, the beautifully designed book "Chess for Educators - How to Organize and Promote a Meaningful Chess Teaching Program" serves as quite a guiding light for chess parents and trainers. The book is surely the most comprehensive guide yet for teachers and parents in the chess world.

Karel van Delft and scientist Giovanni Sala at a Japanese restaurant in London. Go on, identify some very strong GMs in the background. (c) Karel van Delft






 
The book begins with a clear premise. "There is a distinction between competitive chess and educational (instructional) chess... Also, the role of parents is often more important." Karel sets out to deal with not which effects chess education can have, but which combination of which chess-teaching methods and which form of didactic coaching can lead to optimal learning effects for certain target groups, and in which circumstances.

"In other words, it’s all about combinations – in the same way that the combination of hydrogen and oxygen produces water," he writes.

Why Chess is Great for Kids?

Chess is a playground for the brain. Children enjoy playing it, and it poses fascinating challenges to their brain. But the game also widens their horizon. Chess teaches us life lessons – for example, the concept of problem-solving. Another example of an insight that children can pick up effortlessly during a chess lesson: at the chessboard, you always have to look first what your opponent can do, and this is just like in traffic – if you don’t look what others are doing, accidents may happen, writes Van Delft.

Karel van Delft says, "I have come to the conclusion, just like many of my colleague psychologists, that chess is a metaphor for life. You can learn to shape your personality, and develop self-knowledge, self-confidence, 
self-management and a ‘growth mindset’: ‘looking, thinking and doing’, judgement and planning etc.

Chess can contribute to the cognitive, social, emotional and meta-cognitive development of children. 

For children with special needs and other groups, chess can also be a means for empowerment. It helps them develop self-respect, and to get a grip on themselves and their environment.

In other words, especially for children, chess has many benefits. What are these exactly, and how can chess have a positive influence on the education of children? That is what we examine in this book, says Karel van Delft.

Chess school Schaakacademie Apeldoorn. (c) Karel van Delft

Grandchildren Hidde and Lois Weller with IM Merijn van Delft and Karel van Delft playing Hands and Brains. (c) Karel van Delft

Sunshine chess: Grandson Hidde takes on Karel van Delft in the Park de Vlindertuin. Photo: Harry Weller

For Karel, this is not pure theory. He backs it up with more than thirty years of practical experience.

The book is surely the most comprehensive guide yet for teachers and parents in the chess world.

First, he has two very worthy chess opponents and research subjects in-house. His son, International Master Merijn van Delft, and grandson, Hidde, 9. The young Mr Hidde is known to train four and more hours a day when required! Hidde's sisters also play chess. 

Karel van Delft
Hertog van Gelre primary
school chess lesson. (c) Karel van Delft

Merijn, on his part, became the under-16 Dutch champion in 1995, five years after Karel and he "entered the world of chess starting from scratch."

Second, Karel also coordinates the Schaakacademie Apeldoorn. The academy organises classes in schools (individual plus group training courses for older, younger talented players) and groups with special needs (e.g. autism). The Chess Academy publishes a free and weekly online newsletter with many photos that give an idea of the local chess culture. In addition, there is a lot of attention to psychology and teaching. To get an idea, we recommend that you visit the newsletter link. They have been organising daily online chess activities throughout the pandemic.

Based on his experience, some of the specific topics Karel deals with in his book include:
- School chess worldwide
- Pre-school chess
- Organisation of a school chess club, youth tournament
- The role of parents
- Chess, intelligence, and teaching highly-gifted children
- Chess for the blind, partially sighted, the deaf, those with autism and dyslexia
- Girls’ and women’s chess
- Social and therapeutic chess
- Methods and teaching tips for chess educators
- Scientific research (quantitative and qualitative)
- Alphabet (with more than 300 small articles about psychological and didactical insights)

Chess Can Start at Age Two

For parents themselves new to chess, the chapter on pre-school chess is of special interest. Karel writes, "Two-year-old children can already show interest in the chessboard. This interest can be stimulated. You can give a chessboard and (coloured) pieces to infants. You can use the pieces to build small towers with the child, or place pieces neatly in the middle of a square. While doing this, you can mention the names of the pieces repeatedly. You can also put the pieces in the starting position and take turns putting the pieces somewhere – at random: a rook moves from h8 to c5 just like that. As soon as all the pieces are standing in the middle of the board, the game is ‘over’. If you use a chess clock, it’s almost like the real thing."

Tata Steel Chess 2017: Karel van Delft with GM Sipke Ernst (left). (c) Karel van Delft

Delft’s key guideline is: The basis of all training and stimulating is always Variation (methods), Fascination (intrinsic motivation) and Participation (child is actively involved).


Karel and Merijn earlier have written "Developing Chess Talent." The book covers the definition of talent in chess and the method to promote the development of this talent in those young people who have it. The book also elaborates a protocol on how to set up the teaching of chess and how to involve, each one of them in his own specific role, the various components: instructors, coaches, parents and of course the young chess players themselves.
New in Chess has just published 2,000 hours of painstaking research, analysis and counselling ideas by Karel van Delft.
But let's not do all the talking.
Karel van Delft himself is available for compact online training about chess psychology and mental training to chess educators, trainers and parents. He works with players of all levels as well. Themes to discuss are based on personal questions of the participants for example training, learning, self-management.

The training consists of two hours Zoom contact and/or e-mail about chess psychological questions (based on personal experiences and/or documentation which comes with the training).

You may contact Karel van Delft via karel@kvdc.nl.


You can purchase his book in India from www.mychessdreams.com or, internationally from New In Chess.

Once a journalist, always a journalist: NK Dutch championship journalists during Tata Steel Chess Tournament 2016. Alexander Münninghoff (left) with Karel van Delft. (c) Karel van Delft

-------- Games ----------

Game 1: Loek van wely - Karel van Delft MEC Kloksimultaan 2013 Game 2: Ruud Janssen - Karel van Delft July 2012 Game 3: SV Keep it Simply Lucas van Foreest - Karel van Delft
  



Karel van Delft Vs Lucas van Foreest (right) during the simul festival held at the Max Euwe Centre in Amsterdam. Photo: Merijn van Delft. See game above.





Note: The game comments have been auto translated from Dutch to English via Google Translate.

Monday, February 15, 2021

Aicf to Start Indian Chess League, Bid for Chess Olympiad


New Delhi, February 14: The newly elected president of the All-India Chess Federation, Dr Sanjay Kapoor, unveiled a blueprint to turn the country into a chess superpower here on Sunday, starting with the decision to bid for the next available Chess Olympiad and commencing a high-profile Indian Chess League soon.
Caption: The newly-elected president of the All India Chess Federation Sanjay Kapoor (second from left) was felicitated at the start of the Annual General Body meeting in New Delhi on Sunday. Also seen are, from left, AICF secretary Bharat Singh Chauhan, Delhi Chess Association secretary A K Verma and AICF treasurer Naresh Sharma.

"We want India to become the chess destination for the world. We have drawn out a detailed plan to achieve this goal,” Dr Kapoor said at a press conference, immediately after a power-packed AGM.
He revealed that a foolproof bid would soon be prepared to bag the coveted world event as and when the process would begin.
“For a long time, we have been keen on starting the Indian Chess League with an international flavour to popularise the game even more. The first edition, following the franchise-model, will be organised before this year is through,” Dr Kapoor, who is also the chairman of the Kanpur Cricket Association, said.
Dr Kapoor added that the AGM had also decided to host the Women’s Grand Prix, which is an important part of the world women’s championship cycle, to give a huge boost to women players in the country.
“Not just that, we are also going to initiate an AICF-Chess in Schools program to popularise chess at the school level. All our 33-State affiliates will be implementing this simultaneously. We want every school-going kid in India to play chess. This will help in developing smarter future generations, thanks to the life-skill benefits that come naturally from the game,” Dr Kapoor said.
Among the other major decisions taken at the AGM are: single window registration for all players, establishment of a Centre of Excellence and Organisation of a Super Tournament.
“The Super Tournament will see many top-level players in action. It will give our higher-ranked GMs an opportunity to compete with the best in business at home while also help upcoming youngsters improve by watching them from close quarters,” Dr Kapoor explained.
Honorary secretary Bharat Singh Chauhan underpinned the importance of the single window registration process too, saying that from now on every player will be registered for his or her district, State as well the AICF itself.
“The Centre of Excellence will help tap and train talent at the grassroots level, with the ultimate vision of infusing at least 10 players from India in the Top 50 rankings of the world,” Mr Chauhan said.

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